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Are Mocktails Gaining Momentum in DC..?

Are Mocktails Gaining Momentum in D.C.?

Booze-free pop-up Sans Bar takes place May 4, and other area bars are beefing up their alcohol-free options.

BY    LAURA HAYES for WCP    APR 30, 2019 1 PM

BY LAURA HAYES for WCP

APR 30, 2019 1 PM

D.C. is the next stop for a national roving pop-up bar that doesn't serve booze. Sans Bar was founded in Austin by addiction counselor Chris Marshall. He teamed up with Bethesda resident Laura Silverman for the D.C. event on May 4. Like Marshall, Silverman is in recovery and runs the blog The Sobriety Collective. But Sans Bar is "not just for 12-step fellowship," according to Silverman.

"We’re tapping into the momentum of the full sobriety spectrum," she says. "That encompasses everyone from hardcore recovery people and straight edge people who’ve never had anything before to the sober curious and our pregnant friends who want a night out without feeling like they’re the party pooper."

Some people who drink might just want a night off. "It can appeal to everyone who wants a chill environment that fosters authentic connections with fun things to do and no pressure to drink if they don’t want to," Silverman continues.

Read more via WCP…

8 Women Share What Made Them Finally Decide To Get Sober

Spoiler alert! I'm one of the 8 women featured. What an honor! 

Spoiler alert! I'm one of the 8 women featured. What an honor! 

Via Angela Haupt for Women's Health

“Like many who struggle with addiction, my wake-up call came in the form of a series of unfortunate events, each one a neon sign blinking, 'this is a problem,' rather than one single event," says Dani D., 34, who's been sober for seven years. Dani's story echoes that of many alcoholics: The drinking was fun, until it wasn’t. And deciding to get sober? That was hard as hell—but worth it, every day.

“It is so powerful to hear women’s stories of sobriety,” says licensed clinical alcohol and drug counselor Beth Kane-Davidson, director of the Addiction Treatment Center at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda, Maryland. “It’s dealing with a disorder, just as if you were dealing with diabetes or cardiac issues, and people are much more open these days to saying, ‘This is the disorder I had, this is what I did to recover, and this is how my life is now.’” The more women talk about alcoholism, the easier it becomes for women to get the help and support they need, she says. It's time to end the stigma.

Here, eight women reveal their struggles with alcoholism and how they got—and stayed—sober.

Read more via Women's Health Magazine...